Firm: Lavery Lawyers
Practice Industry: All
Region: All
Country/ State: All
Tag: All
Lavery Lawyers | July 2021

In the second entry of this three-part article series, we share with you the next set of intellectual property (IP) –related mistakes (mistakes # 6 to # 9) that we regularly see with startups. We hope you will find it useful for your business. Please be sure to read our first entry in this series, where we go over mistakes # 1 to # 5 ...

Lavery Lawyers | July 2021

An entrepreneur who invests time and energy raising the funds necessary to launch a startup, usually from family and friends (love money), will necessarily want their startup to grow exponentially. Achieving exponential growth requires always more capital, and so the entrepreneur will need to find additional sources of financing. One of these could be venture capital financing ...

Lavery Lawyers | January 2021

The year 2020 will have been difficult for the vast majority of industries, and in particular for the arts, entertainment and recreation industry. The video game industry, however, is growing in leaps and bounds. For example, Nintendo and PlayStation have each set record sales for their games released in 2020, including Animal Crossing:New Horizons and The Last of UsPart II. Over the past few decades, the number of video game players has never stopped increasing ...

Lavery Lawyers | March 2021

Behind every video game, there is intellectual property (IP) which is worth protecting to optimize monetisation of the game. As discussed in Studios and designers: Are you sure that you own the intellectual property rights to your video games, the first step for studios and designers is to make sure that they own all IP rights on the video game ...

Lavery Lawyers | October 2020

The current crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic has already caused, and will continue to cause, significant liquidity problems for some businesses. Companies whose financial difficulties threaten their very existence will have to restructure in order to avoid bankruptcy, either by availing themselves of the protection of the Companies' Creditors Arrangement Act1 (the "CCAA") or by using the proposal mechanism of the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act2 (the "BIA") ...

Lavery Lawyers | April 2022

Telework is not a new phenomenon. According to the International Labour Organization, its rise dates back to the 1970s when a major oil crisis prompted many companies to keep their employees at home to reduce their energy consumption1. That said, since the Covid pandemic, teleworking has become widespread. Now, nearly a quarter of Canadian companies (22.5%) expect that 10% or more of their workforce will continue to telework after business is back to normal2 ...

Lavery Lawyers | December 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed Canadian workplaces. For many organizations, the pandemic and its containment measures have fast-tracked the shift to teleworking.  In this context, the Canada Revenue Agency (the “CRA”) and the Agence du Revenu du Québec (the“ARQ”) have published administrative positions regarding deductible expenses for employees working from home as well as for their employers ...

Lavery Lawyers | September 2022

Quebec recently enacted Bill 96, entitled An Act respecting French, the official and common language of Québec, which aims to overhaul the Charter of the French language. Here are 10 key changes in this law that will impose significant obligations on businesses: As of June 1, 2025, businesses employing more than 25 people (currently the threshold is 50 people) for at least six months will be required to comply with various ?francization?1 obligations ...

Lavery Lawyers | August 2016

On June 17, 2016, the Superior Court1 affirmed the 2014 decision of the Commission des lésions professionnelles2 ("CLP") in Canadelle, s.e.c. and Commission de la santé et de la sécurité du travail ...

Lavery Lawyers | March 2020

  Employers must review their action plan on a daily basis to promote prevention, manage possible or proven contagion among their employees and ensure that business operations continue. Two actions are key: Seeking accurate information from public health officials and governments daily; Taking this information into account when deciding how to meet your obligations to employees while maintaining operations ...

Lavery Lawyers | December 2020

In Canada, as elsewhere in the world, intellectual property owners have made numerous attempts to control their distribution channels through trademark law, copyright law, or exclusive contracts, without much success. However, in a recent decision ( Costco Wholesale Canada Ltd. v. Simms Sigal & Co. Ltd ...

Lavery Lawyers | May 2016

The facts of the Roy v. Lefebvre caseOn June 25, 2014, the Superior Court1 allowed the action of an insured against a life insurance broker and his firm. The context of the subscription of the insurance policy is somewhat unusual and deserves explanations. In 1992, the purchaser of an immovable property undertook to pay part of the purchase price through the subscription of an insurance policy (the ?Policy?) on the life of the seller for the benefit of the estate of the seller ...

Lavery Lawyers | February 2021

In December 2018, section 53.1 was added to the Patent Act (the? Act?) Allowing reference to be made to communications exchanged with the Canadian Intellectual Property Office ("CIPO") During the prosecution of an application with respect? [... ] to the construction of a claim.? This concept is more commonly known as? File wrapper estoppel ...

Lavery Lawyers | November 2022

On June 23, 2022, Bill C-19 received Royal Assent. The bill was introduced by the Honourable Chrystia Freeland, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance, and resulted in amendments to the Copyright Act1 that will come into force on December 30, 2022, further to an order in council issued earlier this week ...

Lavery Lawyers | August 2016

Corruption is a scourge which transcends frontiers. In response to this situation, Canada has chosen to pass the Corruption of Foreign Public Officials Act (hereinafter referred to as the "CFPOA") in 1998, then reinforced the regime thereof more recently. The difficulty with this Act lies in the fact that the offences must have been committed abroad. International cooperation thus remains essential to its application. The difficulties related to the transnational nature of corruption are real ...

Lavery Lawyers | February 2017

The superintending and reforming power of the Superior Court of Québec over the decisions of the Court of Québec is indisputable. It is furthermore confirmed by article 34 of the Code of Civil Procedure1, which grants to the Superior Court powers to judicially review decisions made by the Québec courts, with the exception of the Court of Appeal ...

Lavery Lawyers | July 2016

Last June 24th, the Supreme Court of Canada (the ?Supreme Court?) rendered judgment in the case of British Columbia (Workers? Compensation Appeal Tribunal) v. Fraser Health Authority1 (?Fraser?). Briefly, this case involved seven laboratory technicians from the same hospital who had breast cancer. Each of them filed a claim for compensation under the Workers Compensation Act (the ?Act?), alleging that their cancer was an occupational disease ...

Lavery Lawyers | February 2017

The Latest News from the Canadian Infrastructures Market Defense Construction Canada Issues a Request for Expressions of Interest for Energy Performance Contract Defense Construction Canada (DCC) has issued a Request for Expressions of Interest, dated December 20, 2016, for improvements in energy efficiency contracts covering nine military facilities across Canada (Québec, Ontario, Alberta, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick) ...

Lavery Lawyers | July 2017

In recent months, the Senate passed the Act to prohibit and prevent genetic discrimination (Genetic Non-Discrimination Act). This Act also amended the Canada Labour Code and the Canadian Human Rights Act. The new Act aims to regulate the use of genetic tests, namely, tests that analyze the DNA1, RNA2 or chromosomes of a person for predictive or monitoring purposes or for establishing a diagnosis or prognosis, mainly within a contractual framework ...

Lavery Lawyers | April 2016

On December 23, 2015, the Ontario Court of Appeal1 set aside a decision of the motion judge2 which had granted a motion for summary judgment brought by the insurer to dismiss a claim by its insured.FactsThe insured had entered into an agreement with a contractor to restore the exterior cladding of her home. The restoration process involved the use of water jets. The contractor was first required to seal all areas where water might enter the interior of the home ...

Lavery Lawyers | May 2021

In a judgment handed down on February 16, 2021, in a case involving former de facto spouses, the Superior Court dismissed an interlocutory injunction filed by the plaintiff seeking the eviction of the defendant from what had been their common residence. After having lived together in a de facto union for 32 years, the parties separated. The plaintiff, sole owner of the family residence, left the residence while the defendant continued to live there ...

Lavery Lawyers | August 2022

The Supreme Court recently considered, in the Law Society of Saskatchewan v. Abrametz1 decision, the applicable test to determine whether a delay is inordinate and constitutes an abuse of process that could lead to a stay of administrative proceedings. In this case, a Saskatchewan lawyer requested that the disciplinary proceedings against him be terminated due to a delay that he claimed was inordinate and constituted an abuse of process ...

Lavery Lawyers | March 2016

On February 18 last, the Supreme Court of Canada1 denied leave to appeal in the matter of Intact Compagnie d’assurance c. 9221-2133 Québec inc.2, thus confirming the principles applicable to the duty of the insured to collaborate ...

Lavery Lawyers | January 2022

Introduction Non-liability clauses are often included in many types of contracts. In principle, they are valid and used to limit (limitation of liability clause) or eliminate (exoneration clause) the liability of a party with respect to its obligations contained in a contract. The recent unanimous decision of the Supreme Court of Canada confirms that under Quebec law, parties may limit or exclude their liability in a contract by mutual agreement ...

Lavery Lawyers | January 2021

Canadian newspapers' loss of advertising revenues to the hands of internet giants over the past several years has jeopardized the very existence of many such newspapers. In 2018, our governments announced several advantageous tax measures in order to ensure the survival of independent print media ...

dots