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Deacons | December 2004

In this article, we have summarised several recent employment cases that address the issues of maternity protection, summary dismissal, notice of termination of employment, payable wages and vicarious liability. Some of these cases ascertain the established position of the law whilst others shed new lights on some areas of uncertainties. The case of Sun Min v. Hong Kong Ming Wah Shipping Co. Ltd ...

Even if an idea for a new invention only exists in the mind of an employee, that idea belongs to the company…unless the contract of employment clearly states otherwise! The importance of ensuring that contracts of employment cover this area has been brought into sharp focus by a recent case in Texas, where the rules are very similar to those in the UK ...

Lavery Lawyers | August 2004

All companies must manage their excessive absenteeism files. Repeated absences, even when they only involve a small percentage of employees, have a substantial negative impact on all employees. An employer should therefore intervene immediately to prevent its employees from thinking that they can be absent whenever they wish. Also, many employees use the example of other employees to justify their own absences, causing the problem to grow out of proportion ...

Lavery Lawyers | June 2004

Introduction As of June 2004, the Commission des lésions professionnelles (“CLP”) will implement guidelines (“Guidelines”) stating its expectations of expert witnesses, both as regards their written reports and the content of their testimony. Over the past years, there has been much criticism by CLP adjudicators concerning the involvement of expert witnesses in judicial and quasi-judicial proceedings. Their impartiality and objectivity were often in question ...

Lavery Lawyers | April 2004

On June 1st, 2004, new recourses for psychological harassment at work will come into force. The imminent arrival of these remedies should motivate employers to implement effective mechanisms to prevent and settle situations of psychological harassment at work. However, June 1st is quickly approaching and most employers are not properly prepared ...

Lavery Lawyers | March 2004

For quite a while now, Québec legislation, like that of most Canadian provinces, provides that the directors, officers, employees or representatives of a legal person (for example: an incorporated company) can be sued personally for the commission or omission of acts that could directly and seriously compromise the health, safety or physical integrity of a worker. This offence is covered under section 237 and 241 of the Occupational Health and Safety Act (R.S.Q., c. S-2.1) ...

Shoosmiths LLP | February 2004

International companies can now breathe a sigh of relief following the Court of Appeal’s decision in Serco – v- Lawson which considered the vexed issue of whether Employment Tribunals can hear claims of unfair dismissal notwithstanding the fact that the employee might not work in Great Britain. Section 196 of the Employment Rights Act 1996 used to prevent employees ordinarily working outside Great Britain from complaining of unfair dismissal to an Employment Tribunal ...

Lavery Lawyers | January 2004

Whether your company engages in maintenance activities, manages or rents space in a building,1 you should give serious consideration to applicable construction industry rules before agreeing upon a price: a recent judgment of the Court of Appeal may be of interest to you if, under Québec legislation, your employees are required to be members of a construction trade (carpenter, plasterer, plumber, electrician) in order to perform their work ...

Lavery Lawyers | January 2004

An Act to amend the Labour Code (S.Q. 2003, c. 26) This is a revised edition of a November 2003 bulletin pertaining to Bill 31 prior to its enactment ...

PLMJ | November 2003

The Labour Code approved by Law no. 99/2003 of 27 August will come into force on 1 December next, the first stage of the labour law reform thus coming to a close. Driven by the pressing need to endow the country with more flexible and investment, productivity and employment generating labour laws, the reform was at first enthusiastically backed by the employers’ confederations and firmly opposed by the trade unions ...

PLMJ | November 2003

From among the innovations brought by the Labour Code, noteworthy is the express recognition of what are known as “personality rights” set forth in Articles 15 to 21 of the Code. To be considered, however, is that our legal system has long acknowledged the existence of this category of rights, which characteristically encompass the vital aspects of human personality and are acquired at birth and, as such, classifies such rights as universal ...

PLMJ | November 2003

From among the special forms of contracting employment, special reference should be made, as it is an innovation, to the possibility of an employee being bound simultaneously to several employers provided there are corporate or organisation relations between them, by way of a contract in writing stating which of the employers represents the others in the performance thereof. Where these requirements are not met, the employee will be free to choose to which employer he/she wishes to be bound ...

PLMJ | November 2003

Many amendments have been made by the Labour Code in the area of working hours. One of the most relevant is the possibility of regular working hours being established in terms of an average, subject to an agreement being reached between the employer and the employee ...

PLMJ | November 2003

The issues of holidays, public holidays and absences governed by the provisions of Decree-Law no. 874/76 of 28 December have also been subject to significant changes in the new Labour Code, where they are addressed in Articles 208 to 232, 255 and 259 ...

PLMJ | November 2003

In the area of salary, to be emphasised is that the Code has established that the calculation of supplementary and fringe benefits must be based on the basic salary and length of service payments. Also noteworthy are the new rules relating to special pay for exemption from regular working hours, which is after all justified by the fact that the Code provides for three different forms of exemption (vide III above) ...

PLMJ | November 2003

The amendments made to occupational mobility, also known as functional polyvalence, are quite significant and resorting to this mechanism has become more flexible. This matter, which was governed by Article 22 (rendering of work by the employee not included or object of his/her contract) of the Employment Contract Law, is now addressed by Article 151 (Performance of Duties), Article 152 (Effects on Remuneration) and Article 314 (Occupational Mobility) of the Code ...

PLMJ | November 2003

In terms of geographical mobility, the Labour Code has maintained the prohibition of the employer transferring the employee to another workplace, save where the interests of the company so require and this change does not entail a serious loss for the employee, where the transfer results from the total or partial moving of the establishment where the employee works, in the cases provided for in collective bargaining agreements or where the employee agrees to the transfer ...

PLMJ | November 2003

The system applicable to the transfer of a company or part thereof set forth in Articles 318 to 321 of the Labour Code is aimed at rendering this system compatible with Community Law, notably with Council Directive of 12 March 2001, which focuses on this issue on the approximation of the laws of the Member States relating to the safeguarding of employees' rights in the event of transfers of companies or establishments ...

PLMJ | November 2003

The Labour Code has not made profound changes to the system governing the termination of employment contracts ...

PLMJ | November 2003

The system governing collective bargaining is that which the Code has changed the most. Among these changes, the most important is undoubtedly the provisions applicable to the survival of collective agreements. Under the prevailing law, once a collective bargaining agreement had reached its term, it would remain in force for an unlimited period of time until it was replaced by a new one ...

Haynes and Boone, LLP | July 2003

On May 28, 2003, the U.S. Department of Labor ("DoL") issued proposed regulations on COBRA continuation coverage notice requirements. The proposed regulations include content standards for each type of required notice and provide sample forms for certain of the required notices. This Alert focuses on the significant changes applicable to single employer health plans. Even though they are only proposed, the regulations are important for a number of reasons ...

Haynes and Boone, LLP | April 2003

A recent U.S. Court of Appeals decision underscores the importance to plan administrators of maintaining proper procedures for the distribution of summary plan descriptions (SPD’s) under ERISA. Each participant in a plan which is subject to ERISA must be furnished an SPD satisfying ERISA’s content requirements within 90 days after he or she becomes a participant ...

Haynes and Boone, LLP | March 2003

Now that the 60-day deadline for filing new legislation without suspension of the rules has passed, for all practical purposes all legislation that will be offered this session has now been filed. Bills that could impact Texas employers generally, are listed by bill number and contain author, the committee the bill has been referred to, and any action that has been taken. House of Representatives H.B ...

Haynes and Boone, LLP | February 2003

The Department of Labor (“DoL”) has issued final rules that implement the pension blackout provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (the “Act”). These rules require plan administrators of individual account plans to deliver advance notice of blackout periods and will be effective for blackouts which begin on or after January 26, 2003 ...

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